May 8, 2020

Building a Culture-First Company: Steve Schwartz, founder of The Art of Tea

Building a Culture-First Company: Steve Schwartz, founder of The Art of Tea

On today's show, we chat with Steve Schwartz, founder of the Art of Tea, a bespoke tea company crafting custom blended tea for the biggest names in hospitality.

If you're going to create a product, logic would dictate that you'd want the masses to have access to it. But that's not the route Steve Schwartz went. He wanted his tea company to serve those that serve others. It's one of the foundational values that guides The Art of Tea. In today's tough economy, the companies that thrive will be culture first companies. Here, Steve walks us through the core values and culture-first perspective that has made The Art of Tea a huge success.

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SHOW NOTES

  • The importance of mentors
  • Find yourself a teacher, acquire yourself a friend
  • Mentors can share lessons
  • Friends can challenge you and learn with you
  • Mentors and friends in Steve’s life
  • 3 daughters - all under 15yo
  • Coach - in his mid-70s and helps to separate belief from reality
  • Group of peers in similar businesses - sharing best practices and meaningful lessons
  • Lessons from childhood
  • Had a very perfect, comfortable upbringing until parents’ divorce at 14
  • Sent to live with 19yo brother with no financial support
  • Learned to be scrappy and creative to make money
  • Knew it was a phase and would be able to teach lessons to children one day
  • Entering entrepreneurship
  • Started digital gatherings in Arizona at 19
  • Minimal resources but events were profitable
  • Introduction to tea
  • Mom became very ill with brain cancer - she passed within 10months
  • Steve realized there could be other schools of medicine and treatments
  • Found Ayurvedic Institute and learned about botanicals
  • Began traveling the world for the best botanicals to create tea
  • Tea as a business
  • Ethos of not creating mass-produced low-quality tea
  • Began selling in hotels and creating custom blends
  • Creating a movement against big tea companies
  • Aligning with core values
  • Leadership team reviews the company’s core values every week
  • Impact. Culture. Accountability. Results. Excellence (ICARE)
  • This is much more important during Covid
  • Projections for hospitality
  • 3rd of businesses won’t survive
  • 3rd will barely survive
  • 3rd will thrive
  • Pivoting during Covid crisis
  • Becoming a conduit of ideas between businesses
  • Learning how some clients are surviving and relaying that advice to other struggling businesses
  • Changing marketing plans
  • Government is unlikely to stop marketing efforts so there is an opportunity to be more creative with marketing
  • Creating ice tea for sale to consumers or restaurants
  • How to manage fear
  • If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans
  • Ideas that make Steve fearful and excited confirm he should pursue it
  • He thanks the fear for protecting him
  • Create a backup plan in case things do go wrong
  • Coping with being back at zero
Transcript

Josh Kopel:
Today's episode is brought to you by Yelp, whose mission is to connect people with great local businesses. They're also helping me connect with you which is totally awesome. Now, here we go.

Steve Schwartz:
It might not be full bright today, but as long as it can get super real with what I have in front of me and continue to stay focus on our manifesto and our core values, the future is going to continue to just freaking shine. So bright.

Josh Kopel:
Welcome to FULL COMP a show offering insight into the future of the hospitality industry. Featuring restaurant tours, thought leaders, and innovators served up on the house.

Josh Kopel:
I'm Josh Kopel. And on today's show, we chat with Steve Schwartz, founder of the Art of Tea, a bespoke tea company, serving the hospitality community. If you're going to create a product, logic would dictate that you would want the masses to have access to it, but that's not the route Steve Schwartz went.

Josh Kopel:
He wanted his tea company to serve those that serve others. It's one of the foundational values that guide the Art of Tea in today's tough economy. The companies that thrive will be culture first companies. We begin to Steve explaining the roots of his company's culture. Find yourself a teacher, find yourself a friend. Tell me what that means to you, and [crosstalk 00:01:28]

Steve Schwartz:
The technical term is find yourself a teacher and acquire yourself a friend. So to acquire, we might think that it means actually buy yourself a friend, but text from pier catboat, it's an ancient text that relates back to, one, you have to have a mentor.

Steve Schwartz:
So in my life, I've been on my own since I was 14. So finding mentors, finding people that have gray hair, have things that are in their life that they've been exposed to where hopefully there's some lessons that they can share with me. Then acquire yourself a friend means like you got to go out of your comfort zone to find someone that you can learn with, you can grapple ideas with, and really challenge you on your logic and your thinking, because we have our blind spots. We're only visible to a certain amount. So you have to acquire that friendship.

Josh Kopel:
Can you talk to me about the most prominent mentors and friends in your life?

Steve Schwartz:
Sure. Well, first of all, my kids. I learn so much from them. I have three daughters. They're all under the age of 15 and just, they challenge me at a very raw sense. So I learn a lot from them. The second is I have a coach, he's in his mid seventies. I'm six foot four. I'm a pretty big dude, and he's taller than me and significantly more gray hair than me and just challenges my belief.

Steve Schwartz:
Now, there's a difference between belief and reality. So if you throw an orange up in the air, we know that it's going to come down. There's no question. Gravity is a reality. It's not a belief. So whatever I come into thinking, this is for sure going to happen, I'm almost always challenged on what feels like reality, that context being completely flipped on its head.

Steve Schwartz:
So really great mentors and also a really great mentorship group, a group of other peers that I can surround myself with, that I can grapple with ideas, challenge them. It's amazing how much I can learn from other people that are in similar related businesses. They're experiencing sharing things they're going through, their challenges.

Steve Schwartz:
Through that friendship dialogue, able to really unpack meaningful lessons that I can acquire before any sort of stumbling blocks that might be on my way. So I don't actually run into that. It's your best practice to my team, to our customers, and so on and so forth.

Josh Kopel:
Well, you needed the mentorship because you did have a rocky adolescence. Can you talk about that?

Steve Schwartz:
Yeah, sure. First of all, I grew up in I'd say it's pretty perfect scenario up until the age of about 12. We had a beautiful house. We lived in a great neighborhood in Southern California, amazing neighbors. My parents were well off. I went to private school. Then they had a nasty divorce.

Steve Schwartz:
Really super nasty. The kids had to fend for themselves. So at the age of 14, I remember, my parents sent me to go live with my brother who is only 19 to go live with him in Arizona. It was hot. It's like 120 degrees, no food, no money. So going from a live in housekeeper, private school, to nothing.

Steve Schwartz:
I remember calling my dad, "Dad, can you send some money? Can you send something? I haven't eaten." Literally was eating Country Crock and bread for over a month at that point. He said, "Do you live near a neighborhood?" I said, "Yeah."

Steve Schwartz:
He said, "Is there other houses in the neighborhood?" I said, "Yeah." He said, "Okay, go knock on the doors of the houses and go see if you can do landscaping, if you can wash their windows, if you can clean their houses, and I didn't know how to do any of that. It's like, "Are you serious?" He says, "Yep," and hung up.

Steve Schwartz:
So I started knocking on doors and the first door it was super cute girl. So it was pretty embarrassing being a 14 year old kid asking some girl, "Hey, can I clean your guys' house?" Anyway, after a few houses and lots of rejections, this older couple took me in and was like, "Sure, you can, you can clean our house."

Steve Schwartz:
It got me really scrappy very quickly. I saw it as a challenge. It was like, all right, you know what? This is a phase. This is a period of time where I hopefully, this is going to sound kind of weird, but even at the age 14, I was like, what lessons am I going to share with my kids and people that when I'm significantly older? I'm 82 now. I drink lots of tea, so I look amazing.

Steve Schwartz:
I'm in my mid forties. But when I was that age, I was thinking, okay, this is a lesson. What can I do? How can I see this as an adventure and get through this period of time?

Josh Kopel:
Well you started your entrepreneurial journey young.

Steve Schwartz:
Yeah.

Josh Kopel:
You started at 19, right?

Steve Schwartz:
Yeah. Wow. I'm impressed that you know that. So one of the things that I did at 19 was actually, we started throwing gatherings like digital gatherings, electronic gatherings in the middle of the desert with two other friends of mine. This is without funds. We gathered a little bit of money for flyers. We've got some DJs from Chicago and New York and LA, and we got these big gatherings. One of the first things that we did was we created smart bars. So we didn't want to sell alcohol. We didn't want to go that route.

Steve Schwartz:
So we took vitamins and supplements and herbs and botanicals, and started making what we call smart bars. It was a way for people to be able to enjoy something that was really healthy and energizing that was completely legal and good for you rather than going the other route. That was fun. It was profitable. It was great. We tried something with very little scrappy resources and it ended up being super lucrative in a very short period of time. That was one of our first adventures.

Josh Kopel:
Walk me from there to the journey to tea.

Steve Schwartz:
I got a full paid scholarship after high school to go to college. My first year, my mom got diagnosed with brain cancer, so I moved from Arizona to go live with her. I took care of her for 10 months until she passed. Literally everything you could imagine in terms of taking care of someone.

Steve Schwartz:
The whole time we were just on Western medicine. It was like going from one doctor to another doctor, and we didn't quite know exactly what was the right treatment. They weren't really sure what was the right treatment, but eventually she passed and it really sort of woke me up in thinking that, "Gosh, cancer must have been around for thousands of years." We only just recently labeled it as cancer.

Steve Schwartz:
So I wanted to learn if there was other cultures, or other ancient healing modalities out there that incorporated cancer, maybe not calling it cancer, but calling it something else. I started learning about Chinese medicine, but I didn't want to stick needles in people. Started learning about Western medicine, but I didn't want to be a doctor. I started learning about herbology, but I didn't want to necessarily go that path.

Steve Schwartz:
But I found this one school called The Ayurvedic Institute in New Mexico, and it incorporated everything. It was Western and Eastern medicine, but at it's roots firmly planted in India and Ayurvedic medicine.

Steve Schwartz:
There I dove into my studies and really fell in love with the alchemy of blending herbs and teas and botanicals. In fact, I was chosen as the only student at advanced enough to work with the masters at my school and how to blend and source. That was before the internet really took off, so it was like looking at old Indian phone books in terms of sourcing, and faxing people. I remember I was on a phone call with one supplier, and we need to order some Ginkgo. Granted I'm like 21. Right.

Steve Schwartz:
I need to order some Ginkgo. This is like a dollar something a minute. So I needed to call to be kind of quick. I had some attitude because it was young kind of cocky kid. He's like, "Sir, would you like Ginkgo grown on an Eastern slope or a Western slope next to a river?" I was like, "Dude, it doesn't matter. I just need Ginkgo." He said, "No, sir, I'm sorry. It does matter. You need to come here yourself and experience it."

Steve Schwartz:
I was intrigued, I save my money, I worked four different jobs, I got a backpack, and I started traveling around the world to find the best teas and botanicals possible. I had no idea that it was going to start a tea company. I just knew that I was a huge tea nerd really into wanting to understand terroir and soil conditions and elevation and different varietals.

Steve Schwartz:
I kept going back to origin and started bringing stuff back for friends and family, and sort of blending in my living room and peddling my teas to different restaurants and hotels, and soon caught the attention of Wolfgang Puck and Shutters On the Beach hotel, and trained the first tea Somali in US at Caesar's palace.

Steve Schwartz:
It just sort of grew from there. So really as a passion for blending, and some of these hotels like Peninsula and Tokyo, they said, "Hey, we have this cherry blossom season coming up. Can you create this cherry blossom blend for us?" So really tackling and having fun with whether it's the context of the location, or natural topography.

Steve Schwartz:
Like the Getty museum in Malibu using the native plants that grow wild along Malibu, forging them, and adding those within a blend that we create for them. It's just a really fun passion project that has provided jobs, and an opportunity to service the hospitality industry which I just love.

Josh Kopel:
Well, and that was going to be my next question. Why focus on the hospitality industry?

Steve Schwartz:
Great question. So I spent two years, I'm sorry, about two years ago, I spent two days in nature with my wife's permission to go off and really think about why we exist as a company and created our manifesto. Our manifesto is sort of a blend between a mission and a vision statement wrapped up in one. I really had to get clear on who we are. Who is our customer? Who is our customer's customer?

Steve Schwartz:
If you're into Joseph Campbell, what is that hero's journey look like? So we're not Luke Skywalker, but rather what can we be to be, Yoda, really guiding Luke Skywalker? So the restaurant owner, the GM, the chef, that's really into the passion of their food, what can we do to really help guide them in terms of tea?

Steve Schwartz:
They might know a lot about their coffee. They might know a lot about their wine selection, but when it comes to tea, they may be fumbling a little bit. So we come in and I love the education piece. Being able to piggyback on our manifesto which has a cleared delineation on who we serve and who we don't serve. In it, we clearly state that we're creating a movement against big tea companies with endless budgets, and not wanting to serve shitty tea to supermarkets. I love supermarkets. Don't get me wrong. It's just, we believe that we should serve the freshest and best tea possible, and that's not going to sit on a supermarket shelf.

Josh Kopel:
I guess, building off the idea of a manifesto. You have a company that is foundationally built on core values. I can imagine if there was ever a time to live those core values, it's now. Talk to me about, talk to me about all of your core values, how you guys live them, how that's changed or grown in light of the pandemic.

Steve Schwartz:
Awesome question. I'm going to lean on two professionals within the hospitality space, or one an organization. So the Ritz-Carlton, you ask any employee, why do they work there? They'll most likely pull out their credo. Here's why we exist, and here's why I come to work. I can be a bartender anywhere, but I'm deliberately choosing to be here to make an impact.

Steve Schwartz:
Any Ritz-Carlton around the world, they are all in alignment with what core value or what credo they're reviewing that particular day or that particular week whether you're landscaping or you're sweeping floors, or you're making a meal or welcoming a guest. Currently, I'm reading "Peak" by Chip Conley. Fantastic to listen to you. Fantastic read. He talks about how during the peaks and valleys, the one thing that really kept him going was his core values.

Steve Schwartz:
Especially now, there are opportunities for employees to potentially even make more money, not working than working. So we have to be super clear on our impact, and link that with our core values and how we're showing up for our citizens, for our country, for the restaurants that we work with, the hospitality spaces that we work with. So what we do in terms of cadence is on a weekly basis as a leadership team then that breaks out into our different departments, we review our core values.

Steve Schwartz:
Originally, I had like eight core values. It was challenging for us to review them. We had to get really myopic on our core values. How do we hire based on the core values? How do we fire based on the core values? Not just our employees, but our customers as well.

Steve Schwartz:
There's a certain customer that it doesn't necessarily resonate with our core values. You really have to think is it worth us being kept up at night because they don't actually show alignment. So our core values is an acronym. It's ICARE. Impact, culture, accountability, results, excellence, so all those. What we do as a leadership team is we review a different core value each week.

Steve Schwartz:
We ask a simple question, how does impact, for example, show up at Art of Tea, and we come to the table with like, "Well, so and so on our team has now showed up, or, hey, we got this great customer feedback, or wow, as a department we really crushed it on impact." We review them during this hard time of COVID-19, reviewing our core values and living and breathing our core values, the goals that we're setting in this new norm have to link back to our core of our core values.

Steve Schwartz:
It has to have that why really deeply embedded into who we are, why we exist, and the overall impact that we want to make in this world. We're here for a short time. What are we going to do with it? As I think about the time that I may be on my death bed when I'm 120 years old, am I going to look back and COVID-19, and say, "Man, I fucking just crushed it. I really made the most of this opportunity or I inspire people to live a better life," or am I going to think, "Man, I should have, or I could have." I don't know the answer to that, but I'm trying to live as purposeful of a life as possible and hopefully inspire the team, and the customers around us to really drive that at impact.

Josh Kopel:
Well, I'm sure there's been some pivot in the business since the pandemic.

Steve Schwartz:
Yeah.

Josh Kopel:
Talk to me about that because I know you're really light on your feet and I know you guys have been putting in a lot of work.

Steve Schwartz:
Okay. Yeah. So, we have to be nimble and creative, but still staying totally true to who we are and what we have to offer. So 80% of our business is hospitality, and I'm reading some stats that a third of businesses in the hospitality space just will not come back. A third will come back, barely surviving, and a third are just going to thrive.

Steve Schwartz:
So what can we do to support the multiple spectrum of businesses that are here? Anyone that works in the hospitality space is there because they love what they absolutely do. So we've had a pivot on a few different scenarios. One way that we're doing it is we're literally acting as a conduit. So I'm challenging my sales and marketing team to not call our customers and say, "Hey, order tea." We've never had a hard sell in general, but what can we do to find out from the customers that are succeeding that are growing, how can we, with the customer's permission, how can we leverage what they're doing that's working really well and broadcast that out to customers that are looking for best practice?

Steve Schwartz:
So we're seeing ourselves as a conduit for improvement as a conduit for change, the conduit for ways of having a great solid North star, and moving in that direction. Depending on the restaurant or the cafe or whatever it might be, that's struggling, we're sharing this best practice. The other thing is a friend of mine has a bunch of oil change businesses throughout the state. One of the things that you mentioned was, I don't know, in the past he said that governments would come in and they would say, "You can't put the sign out. You can't put these flags out, these banners out." He said, "I don't know any local government that's now going to come in and tell you how to market it, your business."

Josh Kopel:
For sure.

Steve Schwartz:
That's [inaudible 00:19:40] spot. Who's going to do that? So he's like, "We're going out. We're being much more guerrilla in terms of marketing." We're throwing different ideas up against the wall. One thing that we're working on is iced tea has been, over 85% of all the tea that sold in the US is ice tea.

Steve Schwartz:
We sell ice tea and these beautiful packets. We've won awards for iced tea that's fresh brewed, but we've never bottled. Now, we're playing with the idea of what if we bottled the ice tea, and we make fun renditions of the Arnold Palmer and bottle iced tea. We sell that to restaurants or direct to consumer. People that are used to getting our ice tea, and make an impact in that way. That way people that want a fresh and clean bottle of tea, they can still get it. But it's portion pack for the restaurants that are offering to go.

Josh Kopel:
I want that so bad. Make that.

Steve Schwartz:
That's awesome.

Josh Kopel:
It's going to be phenomenal. I would be a liar if I didn't say that I struggle with fear on a regular basis. I was a Michelin-rated restaurateur six weeks ago.

Steve Schwartz:
That's awesome.

Josh Kopel:
Now, I'm currently unemployed. How times have changed. I'm incredibly hopeful for my own life that I will be able to rebound. I will be able to reopen the restaurant, and the things won't go back to the way they were. Hopefully, they turn out better. I'm wondering how you're managing the fear that you're experiencing.

Steve Schwartz:
I say, if you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans. If it freaks me out and gets me excited at the same time then I got to move forward with full speed. I got to lean into it, get ready to fail, and fuck up, and fall, but get right back up and keep going. So if I allow fear to be, first of all, I thank fear. A large portion of our brain is built on survival, and there's this outer layer that's geared towards upper level thinking.

Steve Schwartz:
I thank my brain for allowing me to see the fear then I push and I really lean in hard and strong into what can I do to utilize that fear, go to a worst case scenario that fear is going to take me to total failure then what's the backup plan that I can do to prevent total failure. It also goes back to North Star. I'm really clear with like our overall impact, and realize we've got to hunker down right now, and make it through this storm, and get super scrappy and creative.

Steve Schwartz:
I'll know that within two years or three years or whatever that right period of time might be that we're going to come out extremely strong. Hopefully it's a month. We have plans for what this means to live in this period of time from now till August from now, till December. So those are the two cadences that we're working with right now.

Steve Schwartz:
We're reviewing it on a daily basis. We're looking at our KPIs. We're looking at our daily output. We're looking all sorts of resources, but seeing reality for exactly what it is without judgment, without criticism, just being very clear on our wins and our losses, and then embracing the momentum as much as possible. I don't know if that helps. That's definitely what's working for me right now.

Josh Kopel:
No, I resonate with a bunch of that. An interesting thought that I had recently, and I actually shared with you prior to the interview is you watch on the news and they say, "This is an unprecedented time in the history of man." I believe that's true. But as an entrepreneur, we're staring into the abyss with regularity. For many of us, myself included, this isn't the first time I've ended up back at zero, and I've gotten through it and I've always ended up better off than I was before. Do you have a story of a time that you were back to zero? A time of struggle and overcoming that struggle.

Steve Schwartz:
Multiple times, but I think each one has been, and I'm a huge fan of Ray Daleo. So the way he sort of paints each challenge as an opportunity to reflect and pivot, and then lean on the people around you that you trust and the advise to be able to really grow past it. Just going back to my time with my mom. I went from fully taking care of my mom to a vacuum getting created. I realized that I was actually sleeping with my eyes open for a few months after my mom passed.

Steve Schwartz:
The level of stress that I was encountering was just huge. I had to figure out a way to develop a ritual, to create a routine, and then also share that ritual and routine with a wider variety of people. That's where I really also fell in love with tea because it doesn't matter what age, what demographic, what gender, religion, you are tea can provide that sense of solace, can provide that sense of joy and ritual, very modern day ritual. You don't need that all the different, accoutrements that can come with it. Just leaves and water.

Steve Schwartz:
Knowing that I have that routine of enjoying tea with my kids, my wife at the end of the day, just sitting down and having a pot of tea. All the adaption, my qualities with tea take the frayed thoughts of the mind and frayed emotions and just gets either really myopic and hone in and tune in with each other. The other thing that I do is a digital detox once a week.

Steve Schwartz:
I turn my phone off completely, and my computer, and everything off for one full day. I've been doing this since my first daughter was born and it was hard at first. It was like, "All right, we're not going to, she's almost 15, and so it was, "First we're not going to answer the phone. Then it was like, okay, we're not going to text. Then it was like, okay, now we're going to completely shut off." I got to tell you just doing that allows the senses, allows your body just fully recharge. If I were to ask you Josh to fully exhale as much as possible, give it all you got, exhale, exhale because medical research shows that if you exhale for a really long period of time, it's going to help you live longer. It's going to help you feel better.

Steve Schwartz:
Great. That's awesome. You can only exhale a certain amount of time. That's sort of what we're doing. I'm trying everything, I'm doing everything, but is this going to work? Eventually, you're going to have to inhale. I think we also have to be super receptive and open and draw in as much life force and breath as we can in order for us to continue to give to the community, to our restaurants, to our loved ones, to ourselves, as much as we can as well.

Josh Kopel:
What do you see the future looking like for all of us?

Steve Schwartz:
Super bright. Yeah. Super bright, but it's going to be rough. If we are built of a machine, what you're looking at is millions, if not billions, of years of development that has created the humans that we are today, and we are bound to be fully deconstructed and repurposed to the energy transfer of our bodies and knowledge and wisdom to other people. So we will break down, but a new beginning and a new sense of ourselves.

Steve Schwartz:
I remember after my mom passed, I got chickenpox for the second time. At that point in time, it was believed that you only get chickenpox once, but I saw it as a new skin it was being developed. So, I'm really trying to see every day as a new opportunity for what can I learn and what can I do to grow and improve and also improve the lives around me. So it might not be full bright today, but as long as it can get super real with what I have in front of me and continue to stay focused on our manifesto core values. The future is going to continue to just freaking shine. So bright.

Josh Kopel:
I'm wondering if through this platform there's anything you would like to say to the industry at large?

Steve Schwartz:
First of all, thank you for the opportunity for allowing me to have the platform to be able to connect with people that are in the hospitality industry. I would not give up on the hospitality industry. I would not go completely to the dark side and say that it's never going to exist again. I think that it will exist in a much brighter and more beautiful, and much more refined way.

Steve Schwartz:
Leaning on our distributor in Singapore in terms of what their experience has been like because they've gone through these peaks and valleys, and they're saying something that we haven't experienced here yet, which is like, "Steve, it's awesome now. People are out, they're buying, they're shopping." We're social creatures. We want to be able to go out and be taken care of. We want to be able to go into a space where people are making a beverage or a dish specifically for us.

Steve Schwartz:
We want to be nurtured in this way. So trust that it is built in our ethos. I'm a little biased because tea is from my understanding and the research and the history I've read is the first hospitality venues were actually tea houses. People would stop and they'd have a greasy dim sum, and then tea to cut through that grease.

Steve Schwartz:
So as the wafer travelers would come along, they would need that restorative broth to renew the senses. So this timeless leaves and water through camellia sinensis, through tea can add so much to the hospitality space, but just know that we're going to get back there, and it's going to be great.

Josh Kopel:
Where can people find you online?

Steve Schwartz:
Artoftea.com. If you want to up your tee game, we just launched a become a tea expert series. It's a full series on how to taste tea, how to understand origin and craft. So by years of traveling, meeting, and working with the different farmers from all over the world and what we do and how we craft our teas here in LA, we're sharing that wisdom. It's free now til May 15th. Had over a thousand people sign up and just a few days and would love just our kindred spirits in the hospitality space to be able to take an opportunity with this course as well.

Josh Kopel:
That's Steve Schwartz, founder of the Art of Tea. If you're interested in his products or becoming a tea expert, go to the artoftea.com. If you want to tell us your story, hear previous episodes, check out our video content or read our weekly blog. Go to joshkopel.com. That's J-O-S-H-K-O-P-E-L.com. Thank you so much for listening to the show. You can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts, and while you're there, please leave us a review, a special thanks to Yelp for helping us spread the word to the whole hospitality community. I'm Josh Kopel. You've been listening to FULL COMP.